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If you Drupelet, Pick it up!

Quite like the Strawberry, the Blackberry is not considered a “real berry,” it’s actually an aggregate fruit! That means the Blackberry is composed of a bunch of different tiny fruits, which combine to make one delicious flavor!

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What's in a Name?

The true meaning of the name “Strawberry,” is somewhat contested by historians. Popular folklore relates that children used sell their berries at the market, and to make trading easier, they would string them together with threads of straw, hence Straw-Berry!

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Brilliant Berries

When you are walking through the fresh produce aisle at your local grocery store, it might be helpful to have a few tried-and-true tips up your sleeve to ensure that the delicious DOLE® Berries you bring home to your family (or keep all to yourself!) are as fresh and mouthwatering as possible!

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Company Overview

About Us

Founded in Hawaii in 1851, Dole Food Company, Inc., with 2010 revenues of $6.9 billion, is the world's largest producer and marketer of high-quality fresh fruit and fresh vegetables. Dole markets a growing line of packaged and frozen foods, and is a produce industry leader in nutrition education and research. The Company does business in more than 90 countries and employs, on average, 36,000 full-time, regular employees and 23,000 full-time seasonal or temporary employees, worldwide.
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Food Facts - A-E

Jump to: (A-E) (F-K) (L-R) (S-Z)

VitaminA

About half of American adults do not get enough vitamin A, a nutrient needed for healthy skin - it helps maintain the epithelial tissues that make up the skin’s surface, eyesight - inadequate intake can lead to poor vision in dim light and possibly age-related macular degeneration, and immune function - vital for development of immune cells. Top sources include sweet potatoes, butternut squash, carrots, pumpkin, cantaloupe, pink and red grapefruit, spinach and kale.

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acorn

A variety of winter squash, acorn squash is so named for its nut-like shape. A 1/2-cup serving of baked acorn squash (103g) is a good source of heart-healthy nutrients such as fiber, magnesium, potassium, vitamin C, and vitamin B6, as well as manganese and thiamin. Acorn squash is also an excellent food for athletes, providing 20% of daily thiamin, low levels of which may impair sports performance. Choose a dark green acorn squash (with up to one-half the squash yellow-orange) that is firm, smooth-skinned and heavy for its size. It's wonderful stuffed or pureed in a soup. One-half cup baked contains only 57 calories.

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Anthocyanins

Anthocyanins are phytochemicals that give some fruits and vegetables their red, blue and purple colors. According to preliminary research, anthocyanins have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, heart healthy, anti-aging and anti-carcinogenic properties. Top sources of anthocyanins include cherries, pomegranate, plums, red cabbage, grapes, apples, and most berries.

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Antioxidants

As their name suggests, antioxidants combat the oxidation - the rust, if you will - of our cells. Fruit and vegetables are some of the best sources of antioxidant vitamins A, C & E, which can help repair, prevent or limit oxidative damage to our cells caused by free radicals. In addition to dietary antioxidant vitamins, our bodies make others, including glutathione, lipoic acid and melatonin.

 

Antioxidants take a nosedive after overindulgent meals, but fruit for dessert helps to undo the damage. In contrast, an American Heart Association review of studies on antioxidant supplements found  that they are largely ineffective in preventing heart disease.

The USDA ranks foods according to their antioxidant capacity and publishes an antioxidant list. Included areblueberries, cranberries, blackberries, raspberries, artichokes, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, raisins, strawberries,  cauliflower, plums,  dates, apples, goji berries. black beans, spinach and prunes.

 

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Apples

Why does an apple a day keep the doctor away? One medium apple provides an excellent source of fiber, and Red Delicious, Granny Smith, and Gala all rank in the top 20 on the USDA’s list of foods highest in polyphenol content per serving size (80 calories). Vitamin C & polyphenol levels levels actually increase as apples ripen. Apples are a top source of quercetin which may reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease as well as lung and prostate cancers according to lab research. Cornell University researchers found liver cancer cells treated with 50 mg of apple extract decreased cancer cell growth by 57%. But put down that peeler: A medium-sized Red Delicious apple with skin has about twice as much fiber and 45% more polyphenols than a naked one.

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Apricots

Migrants from Northeastern China, apricots eventually made their way to Europe where they inspired the term "golden apple." A serving of three medium-sized fresh apricots (35g/ea) has only 50 calories and provides an excellent source of vitamin A and a good source of vitamin C. These fragile peach-like fruits, with their perfumed aroma and ultra-sweet flavor, are also rich in beta-carotene. They can be enjoyed fresh or dried.

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Artichokes

A cooked, medium artichoke (120g) is rich in  fiber, vitamin C, and vitamin K and is a good source of magnesium, potassium, manganese, and folate - all for just 60 calories. Also, artichokes ranked seventh overall and first among vegetables in polyphenols among over 100 common foods according to the USDA. In addition, artichokes supply luteolin and cynarin, phytochemicals that may lower cholesterol levels. Artichoke is also a prebiotic food because it’s a top source of inulin, a fiber indigestible by humans, but selectively nourishing to good gut bacteria that line our intestinal tract and protect us against food-borne pathogens like E. coli. Amazingly, California produces virtually 100 percent of the artichokes in the U.S. - and consumes almost half of them!

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Arugula

Arugula is a peppery, aromatic highly nutritious salad green. Three cups (85g) contain only 20 calories and provide an excellent source of folate and vitamins A, C and K. This same serving is a good source of calcium, magnesium and manganese, supporting your bones. These greens also have significant quantities of the phytochemicals beta-carotene, lutein/zeaxanthin and glucosinolates.

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Asparagus

Sometimes referred to as the aristocrat of vegetables, a serving of asparagus (five spears, 93g) has only 21 calories and is an excellent source of folate and vitamin K, and a good source of vitamins A and C. Healthful diets with adequate folate may reduce the risk of heart disease, fractures and certain birth defects. Asparagus is also a prebiotic food because it’s a top source of inulin, a fiber that is indigestible by humans, but selectively nourishing to good gut bacteria that line our intestinal tract thereby protecting against food-borne viruses like E. coli. It's best to consume asparagus spears the day you buy them, since flavor and vitamins tend to diminish the longer you keep them. But if you need to store your asparagus overnight, cut off the ends and place the stalks upright in a bowl of water in the refrigerator. Asparagus is great steamed or tossed in oil and roasted on the grill. For another tasty option try  "Cream" of Asparagus and Pea Soup.

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Avocados

Sometimes dismissed as a nutrition zero, avocados are actually a nutrition hero; their monounsaturated fat lowers LDL "bad" cholesterol, while raising HDL "good" cholesterol. In a study from Mexico, people who ate one avocado per day for a week saw total cholesterol drop 17 percent. The healthy fat in avocados may also help your body absorb certain nutrients like lycopene and beta-carotene. Japanese researchers have found avocados may also protect against liver damage. An Ohio State University study found that phytochemicals in avocados can help fight oral cancer. Avocado compounds actually signal cancer cells to self destruct, a process called "apoptosis. One-fifth medium avocado (30g) has 55 calories, is a good source of heart-healthy fiber, and supplies significant quantities of potassium and folate.

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vitaminb

B vitamins help convert food to energy and promote healthy skin, hair, muscles and brain function. Top sources include mushrooms, legumes, oats, beans, and green leafy vegetables. However, vitamin B12 is only found in animal sources (e.g. clams, oysters, sardines, and salmon) or fortified products and is often lacking in a strict vegetarian diet. Vitamin B6 helps with protein metabolism, red blood cell formation, DNA repair, and nervous and immune system function. Vitamin B12 deficiency has been linked to heart disease and stroke.

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Bananas

At about 110 calories per medium banana (126g), bananas provide an excellent source of vitamin B6 and a good source of potassium, fiber and vitamin C - nutrients that help promote heart health. Banana consumption may also be linked to lower risk of leukemia, colorectal and kidney cancer in preliminary studies. In fact, one study published in Nutrition and Cancer found that those who consumed bananas three or more times per week had a 72% lower risk of colorectal cancer compared to those who consumed them less than one time per week. Bananas also contain resistant starch, which may support weight loss by enhancing metabolism and curbing appetite. Children who eat just one banana a day have a 34% less chance of developing asthmatic symptoms, according to preliminary British research. In fact, bananas have nutrition benefits for every stage in your life, possibly affecting abdominal pain in children and lowering blood pressure in adults.

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Beans

A 1/2 cup portion of cooked beans (approximately 60-90g) contains about 20-135 calories, depending on the variety. Beans are naturally low in fat and high in fiber, protein, folate, and essential nutrients. No wonder eating two to four cups of beans a week might reduce your  diabetes and cancer risk. Research suggests that substituting vegetable protein sources like beans for animal protein may significantly reduce your risk of dying from heart disease. Red kidney beans provide nearly 60% of daily folate needs and could also support heart health and possibly lower risk of certain colorectal cancers. Just one cup of Navy or Great Northern beans provides half your fiber needs for the day supporting control of cholesterol levels. Also, the Great Northern variety is the top bean source of phosphorus, a mineral needed for healthy bones and teeth. That’s especially important for girls (ages 9-18), 40% of whom do not get adequate phosphorus. With so many varieties to choose from - pinto, black, garbanzo, navy, kidney and white  - beans should be a regular part of your healthy diet.

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Beets

One-half cup of cooked beets (85g) has only 37 calories and provides a good source of folic acid, manganese and potassium to help regulate blood pressure, as well as beta-carotene for supporting eyesight. Beets contain betanin, which may lower LDL (or "bad") cholesterol, according to preliminary studies. For a delicious, unconventional way to enjoy beets, try this Beet Dip recipe.

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BellPeppers

Bell peppers, with 30 calories, are members of the nightshade family, which includes potatoes, tomatoes and eggplant. Fresh red bell peppers have higher polyphenol content than their cousins and higher amounts of vitamin C (providing over 450% of the Daily Value), vitamin B6, vitamin E, fiber, vitamin A and a variety of other carotenoids. The unique combination of large amounts of vitamins A, C and E make red bell peppers a great food for your skin and immunity. Red bell peppers are also loaded with beta-cryptoxanthin, a vitamin A carotenoid, which may reduce the risk of lung cancer. Japanese scientists found that extracts from red bell peppers have the ability to selectively target human cancer tumors, while leaving normal, healthy tissue unharmed in lab studies. Try the Roasted Tomato and Red Bell Pepper Soup for an inventive way to eat this delicious veggie.

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BetaCarotene

Beta-carotene is an carotenoid that converts to vitamin A during digestion. Beta-carotene may help reduce the buildup of LDL “bad” cholesterol on artery walls which can lead to the kind of blockages which cause heart attacks and strokes. This compound’s health effects possibly include enhancing sun protection. Dutch researchers found that dietary intake of beta-carotene was linked to reduced mortality from any cause - including cancer. But don't go reaching for the supplement shelf! Beta-carotene supplements actually increase the risk of lung cancer in people who have ever smoked. Even if you haven't smoked, you're better off turning to the produce aisle than the pharmacy section. Top dietary sources include sweet potatoes, butternut squash, carrots, red bell peppers, spinach, kale and pumpkin.

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Bioflavonoids

Another term for biologically active flavonoids. (See Flavonoid)

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Blackberries

One-cup of blackberries (144g) provides an excellent source of both vitamin C, fiber, manganese and vitamin K, for only 62 calories. Harvard and University of North Carolina researchers found a 30% reduction in coronary heart disease death for each 10 grams of fruit fiber eaten per day. Blackberries also rank 8th in total polyphenol capacity out of over 100 common foods, according to the USDA. Research suggests the phytochemical C3G in blackberries might increase production of both adiponectin and leptin, which enhance fat metabolism and suppress appetite respectively. For an tasty way to add blackberries to your diet, try our Blackberry Sorbet.

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Blueberries

An excellent source of vitamin C, vitamin K, manganese and a good source of fiber - with just 80 calories a cup - blueberries  ranked eighth in total polyphenol capacity per serving out of over 100 common foods, according to the USDA. Tufts University has found that blueberries may slow and even reverse age-related brain decline in animal studies. The same scientists believe blueberries could someday protect astronauts against the radiation-induced free-radical damage experienced during extended space flight. Blueberries for dessert might offset the increase of free radicals and drop in antioxidant levels after an overindulgent meal. Blueberry bonus: Like their little red cousin, the cranberry, blueberries contain compounds that may help ward off urinary tract infections.

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broccoli

Broccoli contains phytochemicals such as sulforaphane, glucosinolates and indole-3-carbinol, that may protect against prostate, bladder, colon, pancreatic, gastric, breast and other hormone-related cancers according to lab research. A medium stalk of broccoli (148g) contains 45 calories and is an excellent source of vitamin C, folate, fiber and vitamin K, plus a good source of potassium, vitamin A, vitamin B6, riboflavin, manganese and phosphorous. In addition to many other bone healthy nutrients, broccoli contains one of the highest amounts of calcium among vegetables (7% of the Daily Value). The calcium alone makes it a nutritious food for your bones. Researchers have found that broccoli consumption strengthens a protective network of capillaries called the blood-brain barrier-which protects the brain after head injury.

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Bromelain

Found only in pineapple, bromelain is an enzyme that may reduce inflammation, speed healing, alleviate asthma symptoms and inhibit the growth of malignant lung and breast cancer cells according to preliminary research. In one British review, researchers looked at ten studies examining bromelain's effects on osteoarthritis of the knee and found significant relief of pain and swelling. As a proteolytic enzyme, research also shows bromelain acts as a "clean up agent," digesting dead cells to help skin injuries heal faster. Compared to bromelain supplements, fresh and frozen pineapple provide a superior source of bromelain - both in terms of activity levels as well as providing a full complement of potentially synergistic nutrients.

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Brussels

Brussels sprouts were first cultivated near Brussels, Belgium, in the 16th century - hence the name. This healthy veggie was just one of the good things Thomas Jefferson introduced to the United States. One cup of cooked Brussels sprouts (156 g) contains only 56 calories and is an excellent source of folate and vitamins A, C and K.  This same portion provides a good source of fiber, iron, potassium, manganese, thiamin, vitamin B6, and offers a substantial quantity of the carotenoids-- beta-carotene, lutein and zeaxanthin. Austrian lab researchers have shown that the consumption of Brussels sprouts can reduce DNA damage by nearly 40%, and that consumption of Brussels sprouts increased blood vitamin C levels by 37%. In lab studies, Brussels sprouts appear to fight free radicals with double barrels: with both vitamin antioxidants -which work may directly to neutralize free radicals - and by stimulating the body's own antioxidant systems.

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vitaminc

Vitamin C is a potent antioxidant that promotes skin health by encouraging skin cell turnover and supporting collagen formation. Vitamin C also supports the immune system by enhancing white blood cell function and may also lower the severity and duration of colds by reducing free radicals and levels of histamine - a chemical responsible for congestion and stuffiness. Research shows vitamin C may promote bone health and enhance the body's absorption of iron as well. Also, Arizona State University researchers have reported that vitamin C may boost the body’s ability to metabolize fat.  A recent report from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) found that about 10% of American adults do not get enough of this nutrient. Top sources include red/yellow bell peppers, kiwi, oranges, broccoli, papaya, and strawberries, all of which provide well over 100% of the Daily Value of vitamin C per serving.

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Cabbage

A dieter's dream - cabbage has only 25 calories per cup - while providing an excellent source of vitamins C and K. Red cabbage is a good source of folate, while green cabbage is good source of vitamin B6 and manganese. Green cabbage provides high levels of two glucosinolates, which are converted upon consumption into compounds that may inhibit tumor growth. Lab research shows that one compound (allyl-isothiocyanate), disrupts the cell division of colon cancer, while the other compound (indole-3-carbinol) may lower the risk of developing estrogen-related cancers, such as breast and ovarian cancer. Yet a third compound released could inhibit the growth of human prostate cancer cells, according to lab research from the University of California at Berkeley. In addition to potential anti-cancer activity, the large quantity of glucosinolates may stimulate the body's own natural enzyme systems.

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Calcium

Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the human body. More than 99% of total body calcium is stored in the teeth and bones, the remaining 1% is found throughout the blood, muscle and fluid between cells. In addition to promoting strong bones and teeth, calcium plays an important role in the contraction and relaxation of blood vessels, nerve impulse transmission, muscle function and the secretion of hormones such as insulin. A lack of dietary calcium causes the body to leach needed calcium from the bones thus leading to osteoporosis. Some of the best sources of calcium include non-fat yogurt, soy, collard greens, kale and arugula. Calcium absorption is enhanced by prebiotic fiber found in bananas, potatoes, onions, garlic, leeks, asparagus and artichokes. Conversely, calcium absorption is blocked by the oxalates found in calcium rich foods such as spinach and rhubarb. Research has shown women who get calcium from food have higher bone density than those women who take calcium supplements alone. Adequate vitamin D intake supports calcium functions in the body.

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Carbs

Carbohydrates provide your body with energy in the form of glucose (blood sugar). Simple carbohydrates include include sucrose (table sugar), lactose (dairy), and fructose (fruits), while complex carbohydrates include starch and fiber. Complex carbohydrates are digested more slowly than simple carbohydrates and therefore provide a more sustained energy source that does not send insulin levels soaring (high insulin may lead to diabetes). Sources of complex carbohydrates include whole grain breads, legumes, fruit and vegetables. Scientific findings back the carb-performance link; athletes loading up on carbs before a big game had more readily available fuel and reported less fatigue than their protein consuming peers. For most people, between 40% and 60% of total calories should come from carbohydrates, preferably from minimally processed foods like fruit and whole grains.

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Carotenoid

One medium carrot (78g) has 35 calories and provides both a good source of vitamin K and more than twice the Daily Value of vitamin A, which studies show helps the eye to adapt from bright light to darkness. Carotenoids found in carrots seem to lower the risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), making carrots a Superfood for your Eyes. Another carrot compound, falcarinol, reduced the risk of developing cancerous tumors in rats by 33%, according to British and Danish researchers. While raw carrots make a healthy and tasty snack, cooking carrots brings out their sweetness and helps enhance carotenoid absorption and also brings out their sweetness.

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Carrot

One medium carrot (78g) has 35 calories and provides both a good source of vitamin K and more than twice the Daily Value of vitamin A, which studies show helps the eye to adapt from bright light to darkness. Carotenoids found in carrots seem to lower the risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), making carrots a food that supports eye health. Another carrot compound, falcarinol, reduced the risk of developing cancerous tumors in rats by 33%, according to British and Danish researchers. While raw carrots make a healthy and tasty snack, cooking carrots brings out their sweetness and helps enhance carotenoid absorption.

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Cauliflower

A serving (1/6 medium head, 99g) of cauliflower contains only 25 calories and provides an excellent source of vitamin C and vitamin K, as well as a good source of folate and vitamin B6. Cauliflower also contains glucosinolates, which may trigger your body's own natural defense systems. This may explain why Italian lab researchers found cauliflower compounds suppressed breast cancer cell growth and may even promote cancer cell death. Moreover, Canadian scientists found that among men with prostate cancer, those who consumed cauliflower more than once per week cut their risk of the cancer turning aggressive by more than 50%, in one study.

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Celery

Sometimes dismissed as a nutrition zero, celery is more like a nutrition hero; two medium-sized stalks (110g) of celery provide an excellent source of vitamin K,which protects against fractures, and a good source of vitamin C which promotes collagen formation, folate for heart health and lower risk of birth defects, and potassium which helps maintain healthy blood pressure levels - all for just 20 calories. Moreover, celery contains quercetin, a phytochemical that may support immunity and may reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s, according to preliminary science. A lab study from Case Western Reserve University found that another celery compound, apigenin, may slow prostate tumor growth.

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Cherries

One cup (21 cherries) contains about 90 calories and is a good source of both vitamin C and fiber both of which can help lower the level of bad cholesterol in the bloodstream.  Several preliminary studies have also linked cherry consumption with the alleviation of inflammation, arthritic pain and gout, making cherries potentially supportive of your joints. One study from researchers at the US Agricultural Research Service found that the consumption of about 45 Bing sweet cherries led to a drop in women's plasma urate, which accumulates in joints during a gout attack. The study also revealed a drop in two key markers of inflammation, nitric oxide and C-reactive protein. Cherries for dessert might offset the increase of free radicals.

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Chicory

Chicory greens are the leaves of the chicory plant, eaten as a salad green in the US. The leaves are eye and bone healthy because just 1/2 cup of raw chicory (90g) is an excellent source of vitamin A providing over 100% of the Daily Value.  Chicory greens are loaded with lutein and zeaxanthin, carotenoids that help maintain eye health (9.3mg). Researchers from Brigham Young found that women who consumed the most lutein and zeaxanthin enjoyed an 18% lower risk of developing cataracts. Chicory greens also provide folate, over 300% (268mcg) of your Daily Value of vitamin K,  an excellent source of vitamin C, and a good source of manganese and potassium - a combination of nutrients that promote strong and healthy bones. In addition, chicory is one of the top vegetable sources of vitamins E, a powerful antioxidant, and is also a good source of other essential nutrients like fiber, pantothenic acid (vitamin B5), and copper.

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Chili

An essential ingredient in a variety of spicy, ethnic dishes, chili peppers are eaten on a daily basis by at least one-quarter of the world's adult population. Chili peppers come in many varieties and range in heat intensity from the milder poblano pepper to the extremely hot habañero. One hot green chili pepper (45g) has only 18 calories and more than the Daily Value of vitamin C. Capsaicin, the primary pungent and irritating compound in hot chili peppers has high polyphenol content. More research is needed to confirm the potential healing benefits attributed to chili peppers, such as fighting bacteria, stimulating circulation, clearing congestion, aiding digestion and alleviating shingles pain, as shown in preliminary studies.

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Chives

With only 8 calories per 1/4 cup (25g), chives provide an excellent source of vitamin A, vitamin C and vitamin K. Chives are the smallest member of the onion family and provide potential health effects through their sulfur containing compounds. According to preliminary research by the National Cancer Institute, chives and other allium-containing vegetables (e.g., onions, scallions, garlic) may reduce the risk of prostate cancer by 50 percent.

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Cholesterol

Cholesterol is a fat-like substance found only in animal based foods. Cholesterol is necessary for many important functions of the body, including cell membrane formation, but it is not considered an essential nutrient as our livers can make virtually all the cholesterol we need-and often much more. Too much cholesterol circulating in the blood (serum cholesterol) can increase the risk of developing clogged arteries that can lead to heart attack and stroke. While dietary fats can raise blood cholesterol levels, there does not seem to be a simple relationship between dietary cholesterol and blood cholesterol. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend keeping cholesterol consumption to less than 300mg per day. Findings from a small University of Connecticut study published in the June issue of Metabolism suggest that while egg cholesterol does raise levels of certain, less dangerous LDL (bad) cholesterol molecules, it has virtually no effect on those smallest, densest LDL particles most closely linked with heart damage. Saturated fats, so-called because they are “saturated” with hydrogen atom double bonds, raise cholesterol levels and are found in animal products like meat, butter and cheese. Coconut oil, although technically more “saturated” than butter, not only fails to raise LDL (bad) cholesterol levels, it may actually help to increase HDL (good) cholesterol. According to the American Heart Association, trans fats raise levels of LDL ("bad") cholesterol and also lower HDL ("good") cholesterol.

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Cilantro

Cilantro has lacy green leaves with a pungent, spicy flavor. Just 1/4 cup (4g) of fresh cilantro has only 1 calorie and is loaded with beta-carotene and lutein/zeaxanthin as well as a good source of vitamin K. Indian researchers found that cilantro reduced cholesterol and triglyceride levels in an animal study.

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Coconuts

Coconut is the fruit of the coconut palm. Roughly oval, the fruit has several layers: a smooth outer covering; a fibrous husk; a hard, brittle, dark-brown, hairy shell with three indented "eyes" at one end; a thin brown skin; the edible fleshy white coconut meat inside this skin; and the clear coconut "milk" at the center. Coconuts sold in the U.S. almost always have the outer two layers removed. Raw coconut meat (80g) has 283 calories and 27g of fat, mostly saturated. However, some research shows that the saturated fats in coconut may not be nearly as harmful as those derived from animal products. Coconuts also provide an excellent source of manganese and fiber as well as a good source of copper, iron and selenium.

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Collard

In the American South, collards are a traditional side dish, often referred to as "mess o' greens." Considered one of the milder greens. collards resemble a cross between cabbage and kale. One-half cup of cooked collards (95g) has only 25 calories and provides an excellent source of vitamin K, vitamin A, vitamin C, folate and manganese, plus a good source of fiber and calcium. This combination of nutrients makes collards a healthy food several times over, with potential benefits for your skin, bones and immunity. In addition, collards are loaded with beta-carotene, lutein, and zeaxanthin making them potentially healthy for your eyes. Like cruciferous vegetables, these greens also supply detoxifying glucosinolates, which may have roles in supporting the body's enzymes.

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Corn

One medium ear (90g) of corn provides a good source of vitamin C, thiamin and folate for about 80 calories. The phytochemical zeaxanthin supplies corn's yellow color and may help maintain eye health. According to USDA researchers, zeaxanthin intake may also reduce the risk of certain types of cancer, especially lung and breast cancers. Enjoy cooked corn! Cornell University researchers found that heat increased corn's total carotenoid availability by 44%. Cooking liberates the carotenoids from the corn plant cell walls, while possibly inhibiting enzymes that would otherwise reduce carotenoid activity.

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Cranberries

Cranberries are a fruit native to North America (so are blueberries and Concord grapes). A 1/2-cup portion of cranberries (55g) contains 25 calories and is a good source of manganese, vitamin C and fiber. According to the USDA , cranberries rank 6th in total polyphenol capacity out of over 100 common foods. They also may boost HDL "good" cholesterol levels. Scientists at Cornell University isolated compounds in cranberries with “antiproliferative” effects on human liver and breast cancer cells in lab studies. Furthermore, scientists from University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth demonstrated similar research effects for human lung, colon and leukemia cancer cells. One cranberry compound, quercetin, may help reduce Alzheimer's risk and alleviate prostatitis (inflammation or infection of the prostate gland) according to lab experiments.

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Cucumbers

Ever wonder where the saying "cool as a cucumber" came from? The exceptionally high water content (greater than 95%) causes the inside of a cucumber to measure up to 20 degrees cooler than the outside temperature. Botanists consider the cucumber a fruit because it grows from the mature ovary of a plant. Per cup, cucumbers (with peel) provide 22% vitamin K for just 16 calories.

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vitamind

Vitamin D plays a critical role in maintaining healthy bones, eyes, teeth and skin. The nutrient is unique in that our skin can create it from exposure to the sun. Since we need vitamin D to utilize calcium, low levels of the nutrient may lead to increased fracture risk and dental decay. Among those 50 and older, those with lowest vitamin D levels were found to have at least 25% more tooth loss. Researchers around the world are finding that vitamin D deficiency may contribute to other ailments, including breast, colon, pancreatic and prostate cancer, multiple sclerosis, hypertension and diabetes. Top sources include oysters, button mushrooms, sardines, fortified non-fat milk, and sunshine. In a dazzling dietary breakthrough, Dole food researchers have figured out how to naturally boost vitamin D levels in mushrooms to over 100% of daily requirements, simply by exposing the mushrooms to more light.

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Daikon

Also known as Japanese or Oriental radish, this vegetable looks like a large albino carrot. A 1/2 cup serving of raw daikon (74g) contains less than 20 calories and is an excellent source of vitamin C. The daikon can be eaten raw or cooked. Shred raw daikon into a salad for added crunch or incorporate in a healthy vegetable stir-fry.

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Dates

While dates come in many different varieties, the most commonly consumed in the United States is the "deglet noor" date. Five of those dates contain (42g) contain 117 calories and provide a good source of fiber, antioxidants and potassium. University of California-Davis researchers found Deglet Noor dates to have the most antioxidant scavenging power compared to other varieties and that a handful of these dates has roughly the same antioxidant capacity as a half glass of red wine.

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VitaminE

Vitamin E is a potent antioxidant that may slow the effects of aging and help bolster the immune system. It shields immune cells from free radicals and may boost the production of bacteria-busting white blood cells. A recent report from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) found that about 90% of American men and 97% of women do not get enough of this nutrient. But don't go reaching for the supplement shelf! The Lancet's large-scale review found that antioxidant pills, like vitamin E, increased overall mortality. Another report found vitamin E pills actually increased LDL "bad" cholesterol in animal studies. Top dietary sources include almonds, sunflower seeds, red bell peppers, butternut squash, and dark green leafy vegetables.

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Eggplant

One cup of cooked eggplant (99g) contains only 35 calories and serves as a good source of fiber. The Agricultural Research Service of the USDA reports that eggplants have a high content of phenolic compounds. Predominant among these was chlorogenic acid, which lab research suggests may block the formation of carcinogenic nitrosamines and reduce the risk of some types of cancer, such as liver and colon cancers. Try leaving the peel on, as Japanese lab researchers found a powerful compound in eggplant skin that may help halt cancer proliferation. The compound nasunin blocks the formation of blood vessels that feed malignant tumors in basic studies.

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